What Are Brand Fonts?

Brand fonts are a set of fonts that convey the personality of your brand. Different fonts evoke different emotions, so choosing them is an art. There are three main groups - serif, san serif and script.

Typography is the unsung hero of a brand identity. It can make or break the design of your logo, so being mindful of the nuances of different typographic 'feelings' is important. The right logo or brand font can amplify the impact of your logo, while the wrong one could turn customers away.

A solid brand font selection is the glue that ties your whole organisation together. Fonts tell a story by bringing a voice and personality to your work.

If you’ve already settled on a logo design, you might already have one chosen primary font that matches your aesthetic. But the work doesn’t end there— as part of choosing your brand font system you’ll also need a strong secondary font and clear body copy font too. They have to match the feel and mood of the primary font - so choosing the right combinations is a skill.

Serif Fonts: Serif fonts are the oldest, most classic typefaces. A “serif” is a small decorative line at the end of a character’s stroke. The most ubiquitous is of course Times New Roman. Serif fonts are classy, refined, literary and high-brow. They are always a good choice for extended paragraphs of text—like books, brochures, and fine print—because they are highly legible and our eyes are accustomed to their shape.

San Serif Fonts: We use a lot of these at Polleni. Sans fonts are great for general readability and work very well for fine print. They also have the added benefit of working well in lower resolutions which makes them perfect for digital uses, including websites and mobile apps. They evoke strength, clarity, modernity and cleanliness. Different weights of the same font can offer drastically different tones, for example: thick sans serifs are masculine and hardworking, while thin line version looks glamorous and noble.

Slab Fonts: Slab fonts are kooky, and characterised by their blocky serifs. They bring an old-school, 'typewritery' charm to a project or brand. They have to be used with care and are usually better for logos and headers, rather than extended text or body copy, but are still easy on the eyes.

Script Fonts: Script fonts look cursive - much like handwriting. They range from the highly calligraphic and ornate styles found on wedding invitations, to the incredibly rough-and-ready 'scrawled' styles used by bloggers to mimic handwriting. They are decorative and so not suitable for long paragraphs of text but can bring a gentle femininity to anything they appear on.

Decorative Fonts: These are highly stylised fonts that evoke very particular feelings in a reader - and are the most tricky fonts to use, principally because of their polarity. Think Comic Sans... They are never a good choice for secondary fonts or for body text fonts.

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